Manx Loaghtan

Manx Loaghtan fleeces, weighing 1 1/2 – 2kg are short stapled at 7-10cm and much sought after, being soft, close textured and lustrous; ideal for hand spinning and felting with a Bradford Count of 46 – 54. The wool is moorit (red-brown) and breeds true for this colour. Once knitted it is fine enough to be worn close to the skin and yet hard wearing enough to be used for outerwear.

Characteristics

Manx Loaghtans are small, agile, fine boned sheep with adult ewes weighing about 40kg. Both sexes are multi-horned (although occasionally polled animals occur) having 2, 4 or occasionally 6 horns with the ram’s growing larger and stronger to give an impressive appearance. During the past century the Manx Loaghtan’s colour has stabilised as Moorit, that is, shades between fawn and a dark reddish brown, although originally, the breed were also found in white, grey and black but garments made from the brown wool was highly prized and so the sheep were selected for this. The word Loaghtan is thought to have derived from two Manx words describing the colour, lugh (mouse) and dhoan (brown) or from Lhost dhoan (burnt brown).  The lambs are born almost black but lighten to the usual moorit from about 2 weeks old onwards.

Geography

The Manx Loaghtan is one of the Northern European short-tailed sheep breeds and descends from the primitive sheep once found throughout Scotland, the Hebrides and Shetland Isles. Up until the 18th century these sheep covered the Manx hills in their thousands but in the last 100 years or so the breed came close to extinction. In the 1950s numbers were down to less than 100 but have been saved by the dedication of a number of breeders and the Rare Breeds Survival Trust and their numbers are now back up to over one thousand but still remain one of the rarest breeds in the British Isles.

Fleece Statistics
Unit Value
Bradford Count 46-54
Micron Range 30-31.5
Staple Length 7-10cm
Fleece Weight 1.5-2kg

There have been several spellings for Loaghtan through the years although now, in the UK there is a move to call them by their proper Manx name, Loaghtan. The Manx Loaghtan Sheep Breeders Group works to promote this primitive rare breed of sheep.

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Julie Melton juliemelton.com
Ian Woolner Flickr
David Joyce Flickr
Georgina Collins Flickr

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